Tribal Court Clearinghouse          
           
 

Tribal Law and Policy Institute

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute is a Native American owned and operated non-profit corporation organized to design and deliver education, research, Training, and technical assistance programs which promote the enhancement of justice in Indian country and the health, well-being, and culture of Native peoples. We are guided by a Board of Directors and an Advisory Board. We utilize an Approach to Training and Technical Assistance which is incorporated into all of our Programs and Services.

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Approach to Training and Technical Assistance

We seek to facilitate the sharing of resources so that Indian Nations and tribal justice systems have access to cost effective resources which can be adapted to meet the individual needs of their communities. We strive to establish programs which link tribal justice systems with other academic, legal, and judicial resources such as law schools, Indian law clinics, tribal colleges, Native American Studies programs, Indian legal organizations and consultants, tribal legal departments, other tribal courts, and other judicial/legal institutions. Through these collaborative alliances, we are implementing a synergistic approach to the delivery of services to Indian Country - accessing a wealth of talent and resources. We firmly believe that the coming years will see a dramatic change in the traditional mode of the delivery of tribal justice training and technical assistance services. Our staff and consultants are developing training through a variety of modes such as interactive CD-ROM and Internet based distant learning programs.

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Publications

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute has developed a series of Comprehensive Publications. We believe that resources - especially resources developed under federal grants - should be freely accessibly on the Internet in order to maximize tribal access to these resources.

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Programs

Our current projects include the following:

  • National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes (NRC4Tribes): Under a grant from the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACF), Children’s Bureau, the Tribal Law and Policy Institute has launched the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes. The NRC4Tribes serves as a member of the Children’s Bureau Child Welfare Training and Technical Assistance Network (T/TA Network) which is designed to improve child welfare systems and to support States and Tribes in achieving sustainable, systemic change that results in greater safety, permanency and well-being for children, youth and families. Under this grant, the NRC4Tribes will provide and broker training and technical assistance to support the enhancement of Tribal child welfare systems. For more information, contact .
  • Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts Training and Technical Assistance Project Goals: TLPI and partners are designing, developing, and delivering a Tribal Healing to Wellness Court Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) Program with 3 overall goals: (1) to provide a wide array of T/TA to assist tribal jurisdictions in developing tribal adult, juvenile, and/or family wellness courts; (2) to provide T/TA to strengthen existing tribal wellness courts; and (3) to provide the field with state-of-the-art information and resources on effective strategies for addressing substance-abusing offenders in tribal drug courts.
  • Walking on Common Ground: Collaborative Promising Practices. Under a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, TLPI is transforming the current www.WalkingOnCommonGround.org website into an on-going permanent comprehensive resource highlighting tribal/state collaboration promising practices and providing resource toolkits to assist those wishing to replicate. TLPI will identify specific tribal state court forum promising practices (along with establishing tribal state court forum learning/mentoring sites) and then publicize these promising practices and how to replicate through both hard copy and Internet resources. In addition, TLPI is identifying specific Public Law 280 promising practices (along with establishing Public Law 280 learning and mentoring sites) and then publicizing these promising practices and how to replicate them through both hard copy and Internet resources.
  • National Indian Nations Conference Justice for Victims of Crime - TLPI has successfully designed, developed, and delivered a national conference for Victims of Crime in Indian Country in Palm Springs, California, in December 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, and the Current Site under a grant from the Office for Victims of Crime. For more information, contact .
  • Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Technical Assistance – Under a grant from the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) TLPI is continuing our work on issues surround violence against Native women. This current program includes three components: We are providing an ongoing evaluation process, revision process, online access, and dissemination activities for Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) resources developed under previous OVW grants. In addition, we are providing ongoing Technical Assistance and Training (T/TA) services in order to assist OVW Tribal Grantee Programs to more effectively utilize TLPI resources developed under previous OVW grants. And finally, we are developing a tribal specific promising practices initiative addressing effective intervention in Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment Cases. For more information, contact .
  • California American Indian Data Investigation Project: In collaboration with the California Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC), TLPI is engaging Native communities in the state on priority areas for tribally specific data. TLPI will investigate available data sources, and issue a final report on what tribally specific data is available, what data is not available and why.
  • Tribal Court Training and Technical Assistance Project - We are working under contracts with individual Indian Tribes and tribal justice systems to provide a broad range of training and technical assistance services, including on-site training sessions, tribal court development, and tribal code development.

Past projects include the following:

  • Project Peacemaker Tribal Legal Studies - We worked with the UCLA American Indian Studies Center, Turtle Mountain Community College, and other tribal colleges on Project Peacemaker, a collaborative initiative to develop, pilot, and implement Tribal Legal Studies curricula for tribally controlled colleges. We formalized the design, development, and printing of Tribal Legal Studies textbooks and instructor guides for each of the nine Tribal Legal Studies courses. The first three Tribal Legal Studies textbooks - Introduction to Tribal Legal Studies and Tribal Criminal Law and Procedure, and Sharing our Stories of Survival: Native Women Surviving Violence (along with the accompanying Instructor Guides)- are now available through AltaMira Press. Tribal Legal Studies courses are also being offered through distance learning (Internet and satellite) by Turtle Mountain Community College, Northwest Indian College, and UCLA Extension (See Tribal Legal Studies).
  • Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Technical Assistance - We provided a Tribal Domestic Violence Legal Program for grant recipients of the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW). The program included three components: Tribal Code Development and Implementation; Violence Against Indian Women Course for Tribal Colleges and Coordination and communication among OVW Tribal Technical Assistance Providers. Activities include regional trainings, on-site technical assistance, development of resource materials and workbooks, and internet-based reference materials. This project focused on the safety of Indian women and children, while helping strengthen the ability of tribal justice systems to hold offenders accountable for violent behavior. (see Violence Against Indian Women ).
  • Training and Technical Assistance for Children's Justice Act (CJA) Grantees - We provided comprehensive, skills-building training and technical assistance to eligible tribes and tribal organizations that receive funding under the Children's Justice Act program. (see Tribal CJA Resources)
  • Indian Nations Conference - We successfully designed, developed, and delivered a national conference for Victims of Crime in Indian Country in Palm Springs, California, in December 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012 under a grant from the Office for Victims of Crime.
  • Tribal Healing to Wellness (Drug) Courts - We have been providing technical assistance for tribal drug courts and developing tribal court specific resource materials. The Institute provided extensive on-site and regional technical assistance under this project. Moreover, the Institute developed six major publications under this project - the publications are available for downloading (see Tribal Drug Court Resources).
  • Tribal Court CASA - We worked with the National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association (CASA) to provide training and technical assistance for the development and enhancement of tribal court CASA programs (see Tribal CASA Resources).
  • HUD Tribal Legal Code Program - We have developed a comprehensive Tribal Legal Code Resource to assist Indian Nations in the development of the legal infrastructure needed for housing and community development. The Tribal Legal Code Program includes a revised Tribal Housing Code.
  • Hopi Appellate Program - The Hopi Appellate Program worked in conjunction with UCLA Native Nations Law & Policy Center and the Hopi Appellate Court to provide a clinical program which trains and supervises law students to serve as law clerks for the Appellate Court of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.
  • NAICJA Administrator - The Institute served as Administrator for the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) from May 1998 – December 2000. The Institute provided the lead role in all NAICJA activities including the development of the Initial NAICJA Website (from the Internet Archive), the design and delivery of NAICJA’s annual conferences, and the design and delivery of the NAICJA Violence Against Women (VAWA) grants. Moreover, one of the Institute’s main responsibilities as NAICJA Administrator was to design, develop, and establish the National Tribal Justice Resource Center under Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) grants. Following the establishment of the National Tribal Justice Resource Center, we also designed and developed the Initial National Tribal Justice Resource Center Website, including the initial searchable database of tribal court opinions and searchable database of tribal codes.

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Services

We provide a wide range of exceptional training and technical assistance services, including the following:

  • On-Site Training - We specialize in the design, development, and delivery of on-site training and technical assistance which is a cost effective method for providing training and resource materials designed to meet the specific needs of the individual community. Our on-site training is designed to cover a wide range of possible topics and audiences. Moreover, we are in the process of implementing training methodologies which will enable your staff to continue their training long after the formal training has ended, including interactive CD-ROM resource materials, Internet based distance learning, periodic email updates to our resource materials, and access to restricted areas of the Tribal Court Clearinghouse.
  • Tribal Court Development - We provide a wide range of tribal court development services, including tribal court development technical assistance services, tribal court development training sessions, tribal court advocate training, tribal bar examination development, traditional/peacemaker court development, tribal appellate court development, policy development assistance, program development/capacity building, tribal code development, and long term planning/development.
  • Tribal Court Review Services - We provide evaluations of tribal judicial systems (and other tribal governmental institutions) to determine operational strengths and weaknesses and to make recommendations for improvements along with the necessary information and resources to implement these improvements.
  • Tribal Code Drafting and Revision - We provide tribal code drafting and revision services for tribes and tribal courts. We approach the critical issue of tribal code development by working with the individual community to address the community’s special needs and legal requirements and to develop codes which reflect unique local solutions to local problems.
  • Grant and Proposal Writing - We provide a range of grant and proposal writing services, including technical assistance with fundraising strategies, grant and proposal writing training sessions, and assistance with drafting of specific proposals.
  • Tribal Court Website Development - We provide a range of computer and Internet services, including tribal court web site development. Besides developing the Tribal Court Clearinghouse, we have created the initial web sites for the National American Indian Court Judges Association, the National Tribal Justice Resource Center, and the OJJDP Tribal Youth Program. We also helped develop web sites for the Hopi Nation Tribal and Appellate Courts, and American Indian Development Associates.

California Staff

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute
8235 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 211
West Hollywood, CA 90046
(323) 650-5467 ~ Fax: (323) 650-8149

  • Executive Director: Jerry Gardner (Cherokee)
  • Program Director: Heather Valdez Singleton
  • Operations Director: Jessica Harjo (San Carlos Apache)
  • Tribal Court Specialist: Chia Halpern Beetso (Spirit Lake Dakota)
  • Tribal Law Specialist: Lauren van Schilfgaarde (Cochiti Pueblo)
  • Victim Advocacy Legal Specialist: Kelly Stoner (Cherokee)
  • Administrative Assistant: Chad Jackson (Cocopah)
  • Program Assistant: Naomi Miguel (Tohono O’odham)
  • Graphics Specialist: Terrilena Dodson (Navajo)
  • Tribal Legal Fellow: Kori Cordero (White Mountain Apache/Cahuilla)
  • Administrative Assistant: Rebecca Macarro (Pechanga)
  • Staff Accountant: Jan Langer
  • Webmaster: Lou Sgroi

Alaska Office

Please note that the Institute’s Alaska office was closed due to the loss of funding for the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Children’s Justice Act (CJA) Technical Assistance (TA) grant that had funded the Alaska office.

Minnesota Staff

Tribal Law and Policy Institute
161 Marie Ave. E
St Paul, MN 55118
(651) 644-1145 ~ Fax: (651) 644-1157

  • Victim Advocacy Specialist: Bonnie Clairmont (Ho-Chunk)
  • Tribal Advocacy Legal Specialist: Maureen White Eagle (Ojibwe/Cree/Metis)

Montana Staff

Capacity Building Center for Tribes (CBC for Tribes)
501 N. Sanders St., Suite 2
Helena, MT 59601

  • CBC for Tribes Co-Project Director: Kathy Deserly
  • Capacity Building Coordination Specialist: Elizabeth Deserly (Kickapoo)
  • CBC for Tribes Administrative Manager: Maria Alidio

Nevada Staff

Capacity Building Center for Tribes
3097 Harrison Unit #207
Lake Tahoe, CA 96150
  • Tailored and Permanency Projects Manager: Joe Walker (Delaware) Phone: (323) 553-1171
  • Tribal Child Welfare Specialist: Suzanne Garcia Phone: (775) 781-3473

* Please note that our staff cannot answer questions about Native Genealogy nor can we provide legal advice or legal assistance with any case pending in any court.

 

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Board of Directors

  • President: Abby Abinanti (Yurok) - California Juvenile Dependency Judge
  • Vice President: David Raasch (Stockbridge-Munsee) - Chief Judge, Stockbridge-Munsee Tribal Court
  • Secretary - Treasurer: Margrett Oberly Kelley (Osage/Comanche) - Tribal Court Consultant
  • Board Member: Evelyn Stevenson (Salish) - Attorney, Legal Department of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation
  • Board Member: Ed Reina (Pima/Maricopa) - Chief of Tribal Police Services of the Yavapai-Prescott Tribal Police Department
  • Board Member: Pat Sekaquaptewa (Hopi)
  • Board Member: Mike Jackson (Tlingit/Haida)

Tribal Law and Policy Institute Advisory Board

  • Robert Cooter - Professor of Law (UC Berkeley School of Law)
  • Jean Buffalo-Reyes (Chippewa) - Chief Judge, Red Cliff Tribal Court
  • Duane Champagne (Chippewa) - Professor of Sociology (UCLA)
  • Edythe Chenois (Quinault) - Chief Judge, Quinault Tribal Court
  • Michelle Chino (Northern Cheyenne) - Professor (University of Nevada Las Vegas)
  • Caroline Cooper - Professor of Law (American University Justice Programs Office)
  • Joseph Flies-Away (Hualapai) - Tribal Court Judge/Consultant
  • Carrie Garrow (St. Regis Mohawk) - Chief Judge, St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Court
  • Carole Goldberg - Professor of Law (UCLA)
  • Ada Pecos Melton (Jemez Pueblo) - Director, American Indian Development Associates
  • Patricia Riggs (Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo) - Tribal Court Judge/Consultant
  • Daisy Stevens (Athabascan) - Executive Director, Native Village of Fort Yukon
  • Tom Tso (Navajo) - Retired Chief Justice, Navajo Nation Supreme Court
  • Mary Wynne (Rosebud Sioux) - Chief Judge, Colville Tribal Court
  • Robert Yazzie (Navajo) - Chief Justice, Navajo Nation Supreme Court
  • James Zion - Solicitor, Navajo Nation Supreme Court

Staff Biographies

Jerry Gardner J.D. (Cherokee) is the Executive Director of the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. He is an attorney with more than 35 years of experience working with American Indian/Alaska Native Nations, tribal court systems, and victims of crime in Indian country. Jerry has served as the Executive Director of the Tribal Law and Policy Institute - a 100% Native American owned and operated non-profit corporation organized to design and deliver education, research, training, and technical assistance programs which promote the enhancement of justice in Indian country and the health, well-being, and culture of Native peoples – since TLPI’s founding in 1996. He has also served as the Director of the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes. He has overall responsibility for all TLPI projects including TLPI’s Violence against Native Women programs and resources, TLPI’s Tribal-State Court collaboration programs and resources www.WalkingOnCommonGround.org, TLPI’s Tribal Healing to Wellness Court programs and resources, the Attorney General’s Taskforce on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence (Executive Summary/Full Report), and the seven most recent national Victims of Crime in Indian Country Conferences. He has served as a Council Member of the American Bar Association (ABA) Section on Individual Rights and Responsibilities (IRR) and an ABA Tribal Courts Council member. He is the author of numerous publications and resources. He received a B.A. in Political Science from Northwestern University in 1976 and a J.D. from Antioch School of Law in 1979. He has served as an Adjunct Professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law, UCLA School of Law, and Southwestern School of Law. He previously served as the Administrator for the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA). He has been a tribal appellate court judge for tribes including Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians (North Dakota) and Poarch Creek Band (Alabama). He served as the Senior Staff Attorney with the National Indian Justice Center (NIJC) from NIJC’s establishment in 1983 until TLPI’s founding in 1996. He served as a Professional Staff Member at the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs in the late 1970s. He also served in legal training positions for the national office of the Legal Services Corporation and the American Indian Lawyer Training Program.

Heather Valdez Singleton is the Program Director for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. She holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a Master's degree in American Indian Studies from UCLA and an undergraduate degree in anthropology from UC Berkeley. Her policy research focuses on tribal criminal justice policy in Indian Country. She has researched and written in the area of tribal legal and community development, and California tribal history. Her experience includes serving as project director for UCLA’s Native Nations Law and Policy Center’s nationwide assessment of Public Law 280; tribal liaison for tribal court grantees in California; research coordinator for UCLA’s American Indian Studies Center; and consultant for the Gabrieleno/Tongva tribal recognition project. Her current work focuses on tribal-state collaboration. Heather lives in Venice, California with her husband and two children.

Jessica Harjo (San Carlos Apache) is the Operations Director at the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI). She has been with TLPI since 2008 and is responsible for the financial management, human resources and overall administrative operations of TLPI. She provides grants management support on all TLPI projects including the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime, OVC SANE-SART Training and Technical Assistance Initiative, and the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes. She coordinates grant proposal submissions, semi-annual and quarterly grant reports and supports the execution and implementation of program deliverables. Her background includes 15 years of experience in the areas of executive assistance, event coordination, corporate and tribal sponsorships, and ethnic marketing.

Chia Halpern Beetso J.D. (Spirit Lake Dakota) is the Tribal Court Specialist at the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) and has experience working with tribal courts, federal Indian policy and tribal law. She received her juris doctor from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. Prior to coming to TLPI, she was a Deputy Prosecutor for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community and has prosecuted a variety of criminal matters, including domestic violence, in tribal court. In addition, Chia has provided training and technical assistance (T/TA) to tribal healing to wellness courts and has coordinated T/TA efforts on this front nationwide. Also, she has researched, drafted and presented resources on Tribal Law and Order Act implementation.

Lauren van Schilfgaarde J.D. (Cochiti Pueblo) serves as the Tribal Law and Policy Institute’s Tribal Law Specialist, which includes facilitating technical assistance to tribal courts, including Healing to Wellness Courts, and researching legal and policy issues as they face tribal governance and sovereignty. Lauren is a recent graduate of the UCLA School of Law, where she focused her studies upon tribal and federal Indian law. While in law school, she served as president of the Native American Law Students Association and on the board of the National Native American Law Students Association. Lauren participated in two tribal clinics, including the Tribal Legal Development Clinic and the Tribal Appellate Court Clinic, and has served as law clerk at the Native American Rights Fund and the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles. Lauren is licensed in the State of California, and currently serves on the board of the California Indian Law Association.

Bonnie Clairmont (Ho-Chunk) is the Victim Advocacy Specialist for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute’s Minnesota Office. Prior to her employment with the Tribal Law and Policy Institute, she was the Outreach/Client Services Coordinator for Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County, a rape crisis center. While employed there, Bonnie provided leadership in the development of Sexual Assault Response Teams and Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner programs and offered guidance with multidisciplinary sexual assault protocol development. She has worked more than twenty-five years advocating for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. She has dedicated much of her work to providing and improving services for victim/survivors of sexual assault, battering, and child sexual abuse, particularly those from American Indian communities. For four years she coordinated the Strengthening the Circle of Trust Conference, a conference focusing on sexual assault and exploitation perpetrated by American Indian spiritual leaders/medicine men. Bonnie co-edited a recently published book "Sharing Our Stories of Survival" an anthology of writing by Native Women who've experienced violence. Bonnie provided technical assistance to research conducted by Amnesty International USA that led to the report, "Maze of Injustice: The failure to protect Indigenous Women from sexual violence in the USA." She and her partner Jim Clairmont have two children and five grandchildren.

Kelly Gaines Stoner J.D. (Cherokee) is a Victim Advocacy Legal Specialist for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute and a Judge for the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. Formerly, Judge Stoner directed the Native American Legal Resource Center at Oklahoma City University School of Law for 12 years, where she directed various projects involving domestic violence in Oklahoma tribes. She provided training to Oklahoma state and tribal child welfare workers in the application of the Indian Child Welfare Act. As a legal professor, Kelly teaches domestic violence programs formerly located at Oklahoma City University and currently housed at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. Professor Stoner teaches courses in American Indian Law, tribal law, domestic violence law, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. She is also a co-faculty member on Oklahoma University’s Child Abuse and Neglect Interdisciplinary Course comprised of law, medical, dentistry, graduate psychology, and social work students. Kelly has written on a variety of subjects related to tribal domestic relations with a focus on issues relating to domestic violence and Indian children. In 2008, she testified before the U. S. Indian Affairs Committee regarding domestic violence issues affecting Native American women in Indian Country. In 2010, she was invited to the White House to witness the signing of the Tribal Law and Order Act. She is a frequent lecturer for the American Bar Association’s Commission on Domestic Violence and the Office on Violence against Women’s national technical assistance providers on domestic violence related issues in Indian Country. Additionally, Stoner has authored and filed an Amicus on behalf of the Oklahoma Indian Child Welfare Association, whose membership includes 38 of Oklahoma’s federally recognized tribes, in the case of Adoptive Parents v. Baby Girl, 570 U.S. __ (2013). Currently, Kelly Stoner resides in Oklahoma with her husband.

Maureen White Eagle (Ojibwe/Cree/Metis) is the Tribal Advocacy Legal Specialist at the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) working specifically with our Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence grant. She gained knowledge on a variety of legal experiences by practicing law in the private sector for seventeen years. After her work in the private sector, she developed and managed a legal services program for Native victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Maureen has written numerous resources about Native American tribes on issues related to violence against women and children. Her resources are written to assist tribes in developing culturally responsive codes and procedures to deal with issues related to violence against women and children. She authored national reports on child sexual abuse in Indian Country and “The Co-Occurrence of child abuse and domestic violence in Indian country” (2011). She has provided training and facilitated group discussions at many national and state conferences. Recently, Maureen has worked with the Mayans in Guatemala to develop a culturally responsive training for advocates to respond to violence in Mayan communities. She also works on Indigenous women and children’s issues related to violence in the United States, Kenya and Guatemala. Currently, she is a member of the ABA Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence.

Kori Cordero (White Mountain Apache and Cahuilla descendent) is the UCLA Public Service Fellow at Tribal Law and Policy Institute. Kori received her J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, with specializations in Critical Race Studies and The David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy. While in law school, Kori focused her CRS specialization on tribal and federal Indian law and co-drafted an amicus brief in support of the Wishtoyo Foundation’s efforts to preserve sacred sites. Before joining TLPI, Kori worked as a law clerk at the Pascua Yaqui Prosecutor's Office in Tucson, Arizona, where she worked on a child welfare reform project. Kori also spent a year as a law clerk for the San Bernardino County Office of the Public Defender in Victorville, California, where she assisted with misdemeanor, felony, and drug court cases.

Naomi Miguel (Tohono O’odham) is the Program Assistant for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. She maintains overall office maintenance and assists with coordinating travel, equipment and logistical details for national and regional meetings. She is a graduate of Mount St. Mary’s College where she majored in Political Science with minors in Pre-Law and Art. While in college, she interned with the tribal liaison at the Federal Communications Commission, and the Office of Inspector General at the National Science Foundation. After college, she worked as a field organizer for Arizona’s Coordinated and Congressional District One campaigns. Currently, she serves as a board member for Pukúu, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing cultural community services for Native Americans in Los Angeles County.

Chad Jackson
(Cocopah) is the Administrative Assistant for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. He received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a focus on financial accounting from California State University Dominguez Hills, magna cum laude. After graduating, he wanted to work with the Native American Community and received his first job at United American Indian Involvement, Inc. in Los Angeles, CA. He wanted to gain more experience and left to join a corporate advertising company where his duties included financial accounting and analysis. After a few years in the corporate world, he wanted to work with the Native community again. When the opportunity to work for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute presented itself, he was very happy to work with a non-profit focused on Native American issues.

Rebecca Macarro (Luiseńo) is a volunteer Administrative Assistant at the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. She has currently worked as an Administrative Assistant at the Pechanga Tribal Government Center, and has worked closely under researchers and scholars at the Pechanga Cultural Center. She is currently a Political Science major and is transitioning from Mira Costa College to a university. She dedicates her spare time to her family, extra-curricular activities on her reservation, and envisioning projects to contribute to and help maintain the well-being of Indian Country.

Terrilena Dodson (Navajo) joined Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) in June 2006 as the Graphics Designer. She works on TLPI’s publications by designing covers, editorial assistance, and preparing copy written documents for final publication. She arranged the Final Report for the 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th Justice for Victims of Crime: National Indian Nations Conferences. Most recently, she helped with TLPI’s Promising Strategies: Tribal-State Court Relations, and Promising Strategies: Public Law 280 publications. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her two children.

Lou Sgroi is the Computer Technician and Webmaster for the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI). He has worked with TLPI for over 10 years. He has developed and maintained the Tribal Court Clearinghouse (www.tribal-institute.org) website and numerous other websites. He designs and develops all of TLPI’s national and regional conference websites. These websites provide extensive links to additional information that will facilitate tribal justice utilization of technological innovations and the vast information available on the Internet.

Contact

For information concerning our training and technical assistance services, we can be reached at:

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute
8235 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 211
West Hollywood, CA 90046
(323) 650-5467 ~ Fax: (323) 650-8149

 

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